Implementing AI security solutions: A crawl-before-you-run strategy

 

source: seciritymagazine.com | image: pixabay.com

 

In navigating the shift from burglar alarms to digital security systems, many organizations are adopting artificial intelligence (AI) to bolster their security postures. In fact, a large majority of security operation centers (SOCs) employ AI and machine learning tools to detect advanced threats. However, not all AI is created equal and reaching too high too quickly with technological solutions can leave security teams with unclear or inefficient workflows. To get the most out of new technologies, security practitioners should focus on starting small with foundational AI technologies in order to lay the groundwork for a more reliable and mature security system.

It’s important to keep in mind that AI technology is still maturing every day. New AI tools for security, often related to computer vision and surveillance camera analytics, are continually surfacing on the market. Often many organizations feel pressured to try the “latest and greatest” and end up testing expensive solutions that don’t deliver what they promise, which turns them off to using AI entirely.

In some cases, too-advanced systems can provide a lower ROI 

In most fields these promises are easy to see through and organizations quickly become savvy to vendors that overpromise and underdeliver. For example, there is no AI that comes close to being able to flag “suspicious people,” and this also opens the doors for privacy and ethical issues.

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China has won AI battle with U.S., Pentagon’s ex-software chief says

source: reuters.com | image: pixabay.com

 

LONDON, Oct 11 (Reuters) – China has won the artificial intelligence battle with the United States and is heading towards global dominance because of its technological advances, the Pentagon’s former software chief told the Financial Times.

China, the world’s second largest economy, is likely to dominate many of the key emerging technologies, particularly artificial intelligence, synthetic biology and genetics within a decade or so, according to Western intelligence assessments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Is Artificial Intelligence?

source:  forbes.com | image: pexels.com

Artificial intelligence (AI) has become a red-hot topic, with record levels of investment in “AI” companies and promises of capabilities that will revolutionize our lives. Many are puzzling through how AI can add value, and a growing number of vendors claim to be “AI-powered.” Given the buzz and rush to wrap the mantle of AI around any new technology, it makes sense to ask the basic question, “What exactly is AI?”

Start with the practical definition that artificial intelligence is any technology that tries to replicate some broader aspect of human intelligence. I emphasize “broader,” as that’s where a fair amount of confusion emerges. Think, for example, of the ability to perform arithmetic. Most people would agree that this capability is uniquely human. But I doubt anyone would conclude that a calculator is built on artificial intelligence.

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Federal Agencies Mostly Use Facial Recognition Tech for Digital Access

source: infosecurity-magazine.com |  image: unsplash.com

 

 

The most popular uses for facial recognition technology (FRT) by federal agencies are cybersecurity and digital access, according to a new report by the United States Government Accountability Office.

The GAO surveyed 24 agencies about their FRT activities in the fiscal year 2020 and found 75% (18) use an FRT system for one or more purposes.

Sixteen agencies reported deploying the technology for digital access or cybersecurity purposes, with two of these agencies (General Services Administration and Social Security Administration) saying that they were testing FRT to verify the identities of people who were accessing government websites.

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Groundbreaking Research Identifies Likely Cause of Alzheimer’s Disease – Potential for New Treatment

source: scitechdaily.com  | image: pexels.com

 

A likely cause of Ground-breaking new Curtin University-led research has discovered a likely cause of Alzheimer’s disease, in a significant finding that offers potential new prevention and treatment opportunities for Australia’s second-leading cause of death.

The study, published in the prestigious PLOS Biology journal and tested on mouse modelsidentified that a probable cause of Alzheimer’s disease was the leakage from blood into the brain of fat-carrying particles transporting toxic proteins. 

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source: dhs.gov (contributed by FAN Steve Jones)

We’ve all walked through a metal detector at the airport, hoping we didn’t forget anything in our pockets that will set off the alarm. When security personnel can’t immediately identify what is triggering the alarm, the process is halted for a pat down. Though this slows the screening process significantly for people waiting in line and can be an uncomfortable experience for the individual being screened, it is an essential element of keeping all travelers safe.

xTo improve airport security, both for screeners and for those being screened, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) continually invests in research and development (R&D) to build solutions for the future. S&T’s Screening at Speed Program partners with government, academia, and industry to increase security effectiveness at the airport from curb to gate, while dramatically reducing screening wait times and improving the passenger experience

source: cnet.com

The pedestrian bridge took four years of research and 4.9 tons of stainless steel to construct.

If you thought 3D-printed scooters were cool, wait till you see where you can take them if you happen to be in Amsterdam. Earlier this month, engineers installed the world’s first 3D-printed steel bridge, over the Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal in Amsterdam’s Red Light District. After being dedicated by Queen Maxima of the Netherlands, the bridge is now open to pedestrians and cyclists (and, presumably, scooterists), according to a report from the Imperial College of London.

Physical construction of the bridge took four giant, torch-wielding robots six months to complete, layer by painstaking layer, using a net total of 4.9 tons of steel. However, before that process began, scientists at Dutch company MX3D spent four years on preliminary research and development to make sure the finished product would be sound.

Transient pacemaker harmlessly dissolves in body

Wireless, fully implantable device gives temporary pacing without requiring removal

source: sciencedaily.com

Researchers at Northwestern and George Washington (GW) universities have developed the first-ever transient pacemaker — a wireless, battery-free, fully implantable pacing device that disappears after it’s no longer needed.

The thin, flexible, lightweight device could be used in patients who need temporary pacing after cardiac surgery or while waiting for a permanent pacemaker. All components of the pacemaker are biocompatible and naturally absorb into the body’s biofluids over the course of five to seven weeks, without needing surgical extraction.

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Advanced Computer Model Enables Improvements to “Bionic Eye” Technology

Researchers at Keck School of Medicine of There are millions of people who face the loss of their eyesight from degenerative eye diseases. The genetic disorder retinitis pigmentosa alone affects 1 in 4,000 people worldwide.

Today, there is technology available to offer partial eyesight to people with that syndrome. The Argus II, the world’s first retinal prosthesis, reproduces some functions of a part of the eye essential to vision, to allow users to perceive movement and shapes.

While the field of retinal prostheses is still in its infancy, for hundreds of users around the globe, the “bionic eye” enriches the way they interact with the world on a daily basis. For instance, seeing outlines of objects enables them to move around unfamiliar environments with increased safety.

That is just the start. Researchers are seeking future improvements upon the technology, with an ambitious objective in mind.

 

 

 

 

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No More Needles for Diagnostic Tests? Engineers Develop Nearly Pain-Free Microneedle Patch

source: scitechdaily.com

Nearly pain-free microneedle patch can test for antibodies and more in the fluid between cells.

Blood draws are no fun.

They hurt. Veins can burst, or even roll — like they’re trying to avoid the needle, too.

Oftentimes, doctors use blood samples to check for biomarkers of disease: antibodies that signal a viral or bacterial infection, such as SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, or cytokines indicative of inflammation seen in conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and sepsis.

These biomarkers aren’t just in blood, though. They can also be found in the dense liquid medium that surrounds our cells, but in a low abundance that makes it difficult to be detected.

Until now.

Engineers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis have developed a microneedle patch that can be applied to the skin, capture a biomarker of interest and, thanks to its unprecedented sensitivity, allow clinicians to detect its presence.

The technology is low cost, easy for clinicians or patients themselves to use, and could eliminate the need for a trip to the hospital just for a blood draw.

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